Open 24/7, 360 Days A Year. | Emergency Tree Removal, Call Now! (503) 665-3917

Trees That Flourish in Winter

Most people can agree that fall foliage is exquisite. Amber leaves. Crimson leaves. Leaves with shades of gold glistening underneath the autumn sun. The changing colors of leaves is one of the hallmarks of fall. While many trees have bare branches come wintertime, there are also some trees that actually flourish in the colder winter climate.

Trees That Flourish in The Winter

At Mr. Tree, we’re experts in a wide array of tree services, including Beaverton tree removal. We also service Gresham, Vancouver, and Portland as well. So out with the old and in with the new. We can carry away the diseased and decaying tree in your yard and replace it with a healthy one that will flourish in the wintertime. So allow us to provide a few suggestions. Here are our top picks for trees to last you through these wintry months.

One of our favorite winter hardy trees is the Wichita Blue Juniper. Not only does this eye-catching privacy tree have a high tolerance for the colder temps, it’s also incredibly low maintenance. As the name implies, the Wichita Blue has a dramatic silver-blue color that looks beautiful against the backdrop of snowy landscapes. In addition to functioning as a privacy tree, the Wichita Blue is perfect for wintertime weather because it also serves as a windbreak. The tree requires minimal upkeep and needs only occasional watering once established. Additionally, its foliage can be enjoyed year-round.

While the Wichita Blue is certainly one of our favorites, we can’t forget Oregon’s most popular tree-the Douglas fir, which is also the official state tree of Oregon. As you can imagine, Douglas fir trees fare incredibly well in colder weather. After all, in addition to being popular here in Oregon, they’re also a popular choice nationwide as the family Christmas tree.

Once the Douglas fir tree has matured, take advantage of our Beaverton tree removal service. We’ll come and remove the Douglas fir from your yard so you can display it in your living room. How great would it be to grow your very own Christmas tree? Or perhaps you can start a side business and sell them to some of your neighbors? In addition to celebrating the holidays with a Douglas fir, they make striking additions to any front yard.

Another great choice for the wintertime is the birch tree. Unlike conifers such as the Douglas fir, birch trees actually do shed their leaves during the winter. But the tree’s distinctive bark makes it a great focal point amidst barren snowy landscapes. In fact, there are many paintings and works of art that capture the birch tree in wintertime. The river birch tree is an excellent choice for Oregon’s plant hardiness zones.

As the name suggests, river birch trees can be found in their natural environments along rivers and stream banks. Like other birch trees, the river birch features a pale bark that complements wintry landscapes. Plant a few of these and you’ll feel like you’re living in your very own enchanted forest. In addition to their color, birch trees are visually interesting because of their peeling bark characteristic. River birch trees can grow to large proportions so they require abundant space. If you have the room, however, plant them against a backdrop of evergreens or conifers for a visually stimulating winter landscape.

Perhaps you want to plant a flowering tree in your yard that will endure harsh winter weather. Though its blossoms typically signal the arrival of springtime, tulip poplar trees are very amenable to cold weather. In addition to growing quickly, the tulip poplar tree is relatively low maintenance since it’s extremely pest and disease resistant. The tulips bloom in May and June and then turn a splendid yellow color in the fall.

Come winter, though, you’ll once again feel like you’re immersed in an enchanted forest. Tulip poplar trees are a food source for many animals and attract a variety of them throughout the seasons. Expect to spot white-tailed deer, rabbits, squirrels, birds, and many other types of creatures. If you plant tulip poplars in combination with a few birch trees, you’ll feel like you’re living in your very own fairy tale once they’ve reached maturity.

If you’re an avid gardener who misses your summertime fruits and veggies, consider planting a fruit tree. If you reside in plant hardiness zone 8, the bing cherry tree is a good one to grow. The bing cherry is one of the most popular types of cherry. While the tree will remain dormant during the winter, the fruit will begin to grow as soon as spring breaks. The bing cherry harvest is at the end of May and early June. Get ready to do some cherry picking then! These trees can produce up to 50-100 pounds of cherries per year.

Also, since the bing cherry tree is an evergreen tree, it will retain its foliage even during the wintertime. If you do decide to plant a bing cherry tree, just remember to cross-pollinate with a compatible variety since bing cherry trees do not self-pollinate.

If you need to clear out some of your old trees to make room for newly planted ones, be sure to take advantage of our Beaverton tree removal service, as well as our tree removal services in the surrounding areas.

There are plenty of winter hardy trees to choose from and we’re available to help you with a variety of your tree service needs.

Remember that a well cared for tree will last much longer than an improperly maintained one. Ornamental trees should be pruned every year and evergreen trees should be pruned every three to five years. Take excellent care of your trees so that they flourish, even when they’re left out in the cold.